Stay in shares after retirement

In this advice column Jamey Lipschitz from Sanlam Private Wealth answers a question from a reader who wants to know what to do with his share portfolio when he retires.

Q: I have a portfolio of blue chip shares worth around R7 million. I am 63 years old and will have to start using some of my savings to sustain me and my wife in three years time.

My concern is whether I should stay in shares or should I sell and invest in something else? I am worried about what the markets are doing, and need some peace of mind.

I will need around R700 000 a year, and I have some annuities as backup.

There are a number of important issues that someone in this position would need to consider.

Firstly, South Africa and most of the world is in a low-yield environment at the moment. Some countries are actually providing a negative yield on cash investments for the first time in history.

This has forced investors into higher risk asset classes like equities and property for the relatively higher yield they provide. At the same time, however, this has pushed up the valuations of these asset classes and many are now considered expensive. In turn, the relative yield on these asset classes have come under pressure as the prices have increased.

Secondly, even the current situation notwithstanding, equities are considered high risk compared to other asset classes. It is therefore important to establish what percentage exposure to equities is appropriate based on an investor’s risk profile and income requirements.

There are periods when equities do not perform and one must be able to stay invested for the long term and not be a forced seller for income purposes. This will ensure that one derives the full upside and value.

Thirdly, the dividend yield on South African equities is currently approximately 3%. That means that a R7 million equity portfolio would yield around R210 000 per annum. That is a shortfall of R490 000 every year on the R700 000 income required.